Tag Archives: lgbtq

What’s New in LGBTQ: New Arrivals to Check Out for Hoboken Pride

31 Jul

Hoboken is celebrating LGBTQ Pride again in August this year and the library is participating with great events like our Vogue Program featuring Drag Queen Performers from NYC and a discussion of the history of the Dance.  In honor of LGBTQ Pride here are some of the recent LGBTQ additions to our collections.

The Book of Pride: LGBTQ Heroes Who Changed the World
by Mason Funk
bookofpride
The Book of Pride tells the story of the LGBTQ rights movement from the early days in 1960s to current day participants in the movement.  Check it out and see where the movement has been and where it is going from the courageous tales of those who were there.  It is available as a digital audiobook from Hoopla.

Rainbow Warrior: My Life in Color
by Gilbert Baker
RainbowWarrior
The rainbow flag has become an iconic symbol of the LGBTQ pride movement.  In his memoir, Rainbow Warrior, you can learn more about the artist and activist who first created it. Gilbert passed away in 2017, but his legacy and art lives on.   It is available as an ebook and digital audiobook from Hoopla.

Naturally Tan: A Memoir
by Tan France
NaturallyTan
Tan France is one of the stars of Netflix’s popular Queer Eye and the first openly gay South Asian man to be on a TV show.  In Naturally Tan, he looks back at his childhood in England when he was bullied and his path to coming out and living happily with his husband in Salt Lake City.  It is available as an ebook and digital audiobook from eBCCLS.

The Affair of the Mysterious Letter
by Alexis Hall
mysteriousletter
Alexis Hall is one of my favorite authors.  His latest novel, The Affair of the Mysterious Letter reimagines Sherlock Holmes as Ms. Shaharazad Haas a consulting sorceress who must solve a blackmail case of a former lover, Miss Eirene Viola.  It is available as an ebook from eBCCLS.

You can see more LGBTQ related posts here!

Written by:
Aimee Harris
Head of Reference

Evocative, Funny and Heartbreaking: Chen Chen – “When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities”

22 May

ChenChenFurtherPossibilities
With April having been National Poetry Month, May being Asian Pacific American Heritage Month and June being LGBT History Month, I thought I’d share a book that intersects all of these themes. Presenting: Chen Chen’s “When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities.”

Whenever I express my love for poetry, I tend to get the same reaction every single time – a look of horror. It’s understandable why. In school, we are usually taught old, hard-to-read poems. The vocabulary is hard to grasp, it’s hard to relate to and there is a constant pressure to analyze, analyze, analyze. That’s enough to swear anyone off poetry.

But shunning all of poetry is a loss. Like music, there’s always something for everyone. Contemporary poetry is rising in popularity and thankfully there is a diverse group of poets that are leading the way, telling stories that would have been silenced or relegated to obscurity in the past, and opening doors for future voices to be heard.

In “When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities,” Chen Chen’s poems are evocative, funny and heartbreaking. Here’s an excerpt from the title poem:

To be a good
ex/current friend for R. To be one last

inspired way to get back at R. To be relationship
advice for L. To be advice

for my mother. To be a more comfortable
hospital bed for my mother. To be

no more hospital beds. To be, in my spare time,
America for my uncle, who wants to be China

for me. To be a country of trafficless roads
& a sports car for my aunt, who likes to go

fast. To be a cyclone
of laughter when my parents say

their new coworker is like that, they can tell
because he wears pink socks, see, you don’t, so you can’t,

can’t be one of them. To be the one
my parents raised me to be—

a season from the planet
of planet-sized storms.

Chen Chen writes beautifully about love, family, rejection, as well as queer and Asian American experiences. “When I Grow Up” is an accessible and well-written collection that not only acts as a good introduction to contemporary poetry, but has the ability to reach out to those who may feel invisible due to their race, sexuality, or other characteristic they feel defines them.

Besides being available in print from the Hoboken Library, Hoboken resident library card holders can borrow an ebook copy from Hoopla!

Do you have a favorite poet or book of poems?  Let us know in the comments!

Written by:
Samantha Evaristo

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