Archive | graphic novels RSS feed for this section

Looking for Art, Adventure, Mystery and Suspense?: Find It in The Nameless City!

13 Apr

If cel-shade art, adventure, mystery, and suspense are aspects that you feel are missing from your life, then The Nameless City by Faith Erin Hicks is the book series for you! The art is a unique style that is rarely utilized in media and blends into the tone of the narrative as well. Its cel-shade art, blending colors with thick dark shades that emphasize the world and characters around it, are eye candy for first-time readers who are just getting into graphic novels or for someone looking to have an aesthetically pleasing reading experience. 

Set in a parallel version of Ancient Asia, the story unfolds when a boy named Kaidu moves into, yep, you guessed it, The Nameless City! Kai is sent on a ship with other young men to train as soldiers of the city. Kai discovers that the reason behind the city’s unique name is because it has been conquered countless times. Each conquest meant a new name until it grew its infamous name, The Nameless City. As Kai explores the city, he bumps into a girl named Rat, a child of the streets and an orphan, who sees Kai as an intruder since he is not a familiar face and does not respect the city and its culture.

Kai and Rat start rough yet find themselves growing closer while helping each other. In time their chemistry evolves, as they run across the rooftops, trade skills, and goods to survive. I enjoy Faith Erin Hicks’ choice in showing a calendar every chapter to show how many days have passed. You can tell through the days that Kai soon goes from skeptical about the city to falling for the nameless city, and sneaks in as much as possible to explore new locations. One afternoon Kai and Rat find vital information that forces them to work together to stop a disaster that can end the little peace that the Nameless City has. Can they stop this threat? Who is trying to destroy the nameless city? Why don’t you find out today? You can read The Nameless City right now available on eBCCLS and other comics by Hicks on Hoopla.

Written by:
Andre Lebron
Circulation Assistant

Best of 2019: Our Staff’s Favorite Books of 2019

31 Dec

It has been a busy year at the Hoboken Public Library.  We’ve begun preparing for our renovations of the third floor Children’s Department.  We opened our new Toybrary, in the Annex. and the Learning Center.  There have been lots of great programs including our Library Fair in June.  Our blog reached 300 posts last month.  Thanks to all our library patrons here in Hoboken and all our readers world wide for joining us this year and celebrating the written word.  We wanted to wrap up 2019 with a look at some of the favorite books our staff enjoyed this year.  They include fiction, nonfiction, graphic novels, a picture book, and a book of poetry!

Throw Me to the Wolves
by Patrick McGuinness
Throw Me to the Wolves

In this murder mystery set in Britain, two detectives are starkly different in age, temperament, and policy. The suspect is a boarding school teacher known to one detective from his school days. Two parallel stories about the murder investigation and about events of times past converge. The story feels contemporary because of current events (Brexit, fatberg) and deals with the role of tabloids, social media, and the internet in society today.  I liked everything about Throw Me to the Wolves: the plotting, the observations, the language, and the humor.
~Victoria Turk, Reference Librarian

Soft Science
by Franny Choi
soft science

My favorite book this year was Soft Science by Franny Choi. It’s a poetry collection inspired by the Turing test and it’s a true testament to how creative poetry can be. There are poems in the form of a glossary, a computer code and even a collection of Twitter insults run through Google Translate several times.
~Samantha Evaristo, Outreach Assistant

The Starless Sea
by Erin Morgenstern
Starless Sea

I was eagerly looking forward to Erin Morgenstern’s follow up to her fantastic first novel, the New York Times bestselling The Night CircusThe Starless Sea happily exceeded my expectation and was my favorite book of 2019.  I enjoyed the metafiction aspects of it which included stories within stories set in both our world and an underground world where a mysterious magical library exists.  Fans of Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere will enjoy this novel.
~Aimee Harris, Head of Reference

Serpent and Dove
by Shelby Mahurin
serpent and dove

This is a great YA read published in 2019.  Serpent and Dove is  a story about a rebellious witch named Lou who left her coven to become a thief. She then, meets Reid a witch-hunter and they fall for each other. In a tale, of forbidden love, they show plenty of courage and have a lot of loyalty in this series. This book is a must read!
~Michelle Valle, Circulation Assistant

Mooncakes 
Written by Suzanne Walker and Illustrated by Wendy Xu
Mooncakes

Mooncakes is my pick for Graphic Novel of the year.  The story focuses on a witch living in New England who just reunited with her childhood crush.  School Library Journal says, “This sweet, spellbinding story will appeal to fans of magic and romance.”  I was impressed that it was lgbtq inclusive with a diverse group of characters.
~Steph Diorio, History Librarian

Just Ask!: Be Different, Be Brave, Be You
Written by Sonia Sotomayor and Illustrated by Rafael Lopez
Just Ask

Kids are different! In this book, by United States Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, kids are celebrated for being exactly who they are! Just Ask encourages compassion, empathy, understanding, and curiosity. It is also beautifully illustrated! Great for all ages. It is one of my favorite picture books of 2019.
~ Ashley Hoffman, Children’s Librarian

The Real Wallis Simpson: A New History of the American Divorcee Who Became the Duchess of Windsor
by Anna Pasternak
The Real Wallis Simpson

The Real Wallis Simpson is a kinder and more historically accurate portrayal of an often misunderstood historical figure.
~Lindsay T. Sakmann, Reference Librarian

How to Be an Antiracist
by Ibram X Kendi
HowtoBeanAntiracist

Ibram X. Kendi is one of America’s most important public intellectuals. In How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi combines a memoir of his life with a clear guide on how readers’ can confront the structural racism that still plagues America. Kendi’s book is destined to become a classic on high school and college reading lists.
~Karl Schwartz, Young Adult Librarian

The Borgias
Written by Alejandro Jodorowsky and illustrated by Milo Manara
The Borgias

I am excited to read The Borgias, a graphic novel, since I am such a fan of Alejandro Jodorowsky’s movies such as Holy Mountain and Endless Poetry.
~Sacha Chavez, Reference Assistant

What was your favorite book of 2019?  Share it in the comments!

For gamers, checkout BCCLS list of the Best Games of 2019!  My son’s faves have been Super Mario Maker 2 and Pokemon Shield.

Would you like to discuss great books in 2020?  We have Science Fiction/Fantasy, History, and Mystery Book Discussion Groups at HPL!

%d bloggers like this: