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Preventing Suicide: Suggested Resources and Contact Numbers

17 May

The new Netflix series 13 Reasons Why, based on the novel Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher, has a lot of people discussing teen suicide.  Suicide is an important topic since each year in the United States over 34,000 people die by suicide and over 860,000 people attempt suicide, which averages to a person attempting suicide every 38 seconds.  Too often the topic is viewed as taboo and people incorrectly believe that discussing suicide with a depressed person may put the idea in their head.  When I was in high school a classmate committed suicide; she was a sweet, funny, and smart girl whose loss was felt by many.  For this blog I wanted to give along with some books our library patrons can check out on the topic, some helpful phone numbers.

Remember, whether you yourself are in crisis or you are the family member or friend of someone who is, there is help out there and you don’t have to go through this alone.

NJ Hope Line 1-855-654-6735
New Jersey’s 24/7 Peer Support & Suicide Prevention Hotline

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255)
Nacional de Prevencion del Suicidio 1-888-628-9454
Provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for yourself or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals.

Here are some books available from BCCLS Libraries on the Topic of Suicide.

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Understanding Suicide: A National Epidemic, by Connie Goldsmith

Goldsmith examines causes of suicide and its impact on those whose loved ones committed suicide.  Understanding Suicide also looks at coping techniques and warning signs.

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Image via Amazon

Teen Suicide, by Judith Galas

In Teen Suicide, Galas looks at the rising issue of teen suicide, possible causes, and possible preventions.

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Teen Suicide, by Lorena Huddle and Jay Schleifer

The Teen Mental Health Series is written for teens in simple language to give them an overview of common mental health issues.  Teen Suicide looks at some of causes of suicide attempts, how to help someone that may be suicidal and places to look for assistance.

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Eight Stories Up: An Adolescent Chooses Hope Over Suicide, by DeQuincy A. Lezine, with David Brent

Eight Stories Up chronicles Lezine’s own struggles as well as providing expertise from psychiatric expert David Brent about the causes and treatment of suicide in young people.  Eight Stories Up is part of the Adolescent Mental Health Initiative series of books written for teenagers.

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Beyond Bullying: Breaking the Cycle of Shame, Bullying, and Violence, by Jonathan Fast

Beyond Bullying looks at causes of bullying.  Fast specifically looks at the harassment of LGBT teens that can lead to suicide, domestic abuse, and school shootings.  The author also makes suggestions for stemming the tide of bullying.

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Healing Suicidal Veterans: Recognizing, Supporting and Answering Their Pleas for Help, by Victor Montgomery

With a large number or returning veterans having symptoms of post-traumatic Stress Disorder, there has been an increase of suicides among the veterans returning from the Middle East.  Montgomery, himself a veteran, discusses in Healing Suicidal Veterans true stories of veterans’ experiences with mental health issues.  He also discusses warning signs and strategies for assistance.

Veterans in Crisis can call these numbers for help specifically for them:
Veterans Counseling Hotline CALL 1-866-VETS-NJ4 (1-866-838-7654)
Provides 24/7 peer support from Veterans who can relate, and case management – they follow up with you.

Veterans Crisis Line 1-800-273-TALK (8255) Veterans Press 1 or send a text message to 838255
Connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders.

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How I Stayed Alive When My Brain Was Trying to Kill Me: One Person’s Guide to Suicide Prevention, by Susan Rose Blauner

Blauner herself is the survivor of multiple suicide attempts and in How I Stayed Alive When My Brain Was Trying to Kill Me, she discusses her own experiences as well as coping mechanisms for those experiencing suicidal thoughts including support groups, journaling and creating a crisis plan.

For more information about services that can help for our local readers visit State of New Jersey Department of Human Services Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services: http://www.state.nj.us/humanservices/dmhas/home/

-Written by Aimee Harris, Head of Reference

Read AND Listen to Your Favorite Books: And, Task 5 in a Librarian’s Read Harder Challenge

3 May

Whenever I enjoy something, I want to do it again. This applies to experiences, travel, food, and most importantly books! If I really like reading a book, I seek out the audiobook to experience the story again. In this post I will share books that I have both read and listened to because I enjoyed them so much. This post also ties into the Read Harder Challenge I’ve been following this year (click here for more about that journey).

Back in 2011 Jane Pratt, the legendary editor of Sassy and Jane magazines, established a website called xoJane. I was a fan back then, mostly for the edgy and entertaining beauty articles written by Cat Marnell.

No offense to Vogue and Glamour and Marie Claire et al., but their beauty content doesn’t usually include references to hip-hop songs that hearken back to my childhood, or advise readers to get lip injections for a “sexy baby” look, or publish enthusiastic reviews for a drugstore brand lipstick where the dek (or subhead) repeats the word “OBSESSED” seven times in all caps.

These are all pieces by Cat Marnell.

She definitely influenced my beauty purchases when she wrote regularly for xoJane. Out of the previous articles I cited:

a) I purchased one of the BB creams mentioned in the article but gave it to a friend because it didn’t suit my skin tone.

b) As of now I am not interested in injecting fillers in my lips or anywhere else in my face, but Cat’s garter tights are awesome and I bought those.

c) Cat Marnell inspired to me to buy nearly all the Kate Moss for Rimmel lipsticks, and she’s totally right, they’re the real deal.

Cat was also known for being outspoken about her drug use on xoJane. This article she wrote after Whitney Houston died of a drug overdose in 2012 went viral. Her erratic behavior landed her on Page Six and was much discussed in the media gossip sphere. She eventually parted ways with xoJane (which folded in December 2016), but left with a book deal. Her memoir, How to Murder Your Life, was published this past January.

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How to Murder Your Life: A Memoir, by Cat Marnell

I requested the book as soon as it was available. After my copy arrived at the library, I received a very concerned phone call from a colleague who was worried that I borrowed the book for ideas on how to murder my own life. I assured my colleague that How to Murder Your Life is just a title and is someone else’s story, and all is well with me.

Cat is very honest about growing up in a dysfunctional family and how her drug abuse started with a Ritalin prescription she received as a teen. At times the book is hard to read. Cat encountered some awful men in the depths of her addiction and it was painful to read the parts where she recounted how the men took advantage of her and abused her.

If you’re like me and love magazines you will enjoy reading about Cat’s time working at Conde Nast. She dishes about sharing an elevator at 4 Times Square with Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour, and about the editors of Lucky magazine, which I loved reading in the 2000s when Kim France and Andrea Linett were at the helm. (I owned and loved the book The Lucky Guide to Mastering Any Style written by France and Linett, which includes an appearance by Cat.) But it was frustrating to see how Cat threw away an amazing career in which she excelled as a result of her addiction, despite having a supportive boss who forgave her after making many mistakes on the job.

Cat is a gifted writer–her writing in this book is light years beyond this xoJane piece where one paragraph includes the word “vanilla” repeated over and over. In the book she admitted to writing many xoJane pieces while high. She is self aware, and owns the messy parts of her life and how her actions impacted other people. Namely, her coworkers who had to pick up her slack, her sister who tolerated much bad behavior, and her roommates who also had to deal with Cat’s addict friends.

When I saw that she narrated the audiobook, I borrowed it from CloudLibrary and listened to it over a few days. (You can also borrow the audiobook on CD.) Hearing Cat tell her story made me enjoy it even more. And I was also able to fulfill my fifth task on the Read Harder Challenge: Read a book you’ve read before.

I look forward to reading more from Cat Marnell, be it longform narratives or beauty writing. I am always looking for amazing new lipsticks to try.

Following are some other books that I have both read and listened to on audio.

Amy Poehler, Yes Please  (I’ve written before about this book for the blog.)

Carrie Fisher, Wishful Drinking (What a broad! Carrie, you left this world too soon. RIP.)

Side bar: These were two picks from the Lady Memoir Book Club I lead at Little City Books. We’re meeting next on Wednesday May 17 at 7 PM to discuss Hope Jahren’s Lab Girl. Join us!

Lucy Sykes and Jo Piazza, The Knockoff (I read this with the Library’s Mile Square City Readers Book Club and enjoyed it. This author duo will be back this summer with Fitness Junkie, which I plan to read.)

Aziz Ansari, Modern Romance (Dating in these times: the struggle is real. Although Aziz is a comedian, he teamed up with a sociologist to write this book, which has well-researched data and thoughtful insights on dating in these modern times, where singles swipe left or right on their phones through what seems like endless potential love interests.)

For those who are concerned that listening to audiobooks isn’t reading: IT IS READING! Remember, book printing didn’t exist until the printing press was invented at the start of the Renaissance, and most stories were told orally. I believe that audiobooks are part of that oral tradition. So, if you like audiobooks, this librarian totally supports you in your enjoyment of them.

What’s your favorite audiobook?

-Written by Kerry Weinstein, Reference Librarian

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