The Question of Youth vs Young: P.S. I Love You

15 May


What is the difference really? I love challenging subjective vs norm definitions.

Recently I found myself re-watching a movie called P.S. I Love You. A little background without spoilers, it’s basically a rom com film about a woman who loses her husband too early in life and for his last act of love he left her birthday gifts to come for after he passed that she could follow in order to help her cope with his loss.

What I find interesting is how you can watch movies so many times in life and certain things won’t hit you until you’ve reached a certain age or gone through something in life that’ll make a single statement you once brushed off seem so deep and relevant to you.

There is this scene in the movie where the female protagonist is talking to a male costar and he says:

“We’re so arrogant, aren’t we? So afraid of age, we do everything we can to prevent it. We don’t realize what a privilege it is to grow old with someone. Someone who doesn’t drive you to commit murder or doesn’t humiliate you beyond repair.”

It just so happens that this quote comes directly from the book P.S. I Love You by Cecilia Ahern. This alone brings me that aha moment because it survived the process of scripting and not only made it to the big screen, but it also made an impression on me. So, it is this very line that lit a spark in that dark corner of my mind that almost laid unoccupied.

It’s an interesting observation. So simple and yet so fleeting to some – but so deep and just hit me right in the feels. We forget sometimes how grateful we should be to live. We try so hard to fight it, ultimately wasting our time and life preventing us actually living so that we can live longer. Doesn’t that just get you right in the chest? The irony that most of our adult lives we spend trying to stay younger, look younger, when we should realize that really growing old is the best gift we can be given.

To interject but also make my point in a different way – there’s this line in this song by Adam Levine that I heard in a movie called Begin Again, but you may also get it on CD – both from the motion picture soundtrack or from Maroon 5’s album V.

“God, tell us the reason youth is wasted on the young” from “Lost Stars” by Adam Levine

Books like Cracking the Aging Code: The New Science of Growing Old – and What It Means for Staying Young by Josh Mitteldorf or The Little Book of Life Hacks: How to make Your Life Happier, Healthier, and More Beautiful by Yumi Sakugawa are available from BCCLS libraries. But doesn’t the question really stand, “What makes you young?”

We live in this world where youth and being young is basically something to worship and idolized. But we forget the value and the gratitude one should have to be able to grow old. To experience and learn.

Why is youth wasted on the young? Such an inane question but it strikes true and then sparks another question, what is youth? But aren’t we all existing and growing and developing until we aren’t anymore? Aren’t we all youth? Constantly maturing.  Watch or read P.S. I Love You and see what you think!  You can borrow it as an ebook from eLibraryNJ.  Let us know in the comments if you have a favorite book about aging or what it means to be young.

Written by:
Sherissa Salas
Adult Programming Assistant

Board Books at the Library

8 May

“Reading to children even before they can understand words, teaches them to associate books with love and affection.”- Unknown

Board books are more than sturdier versions of picture books. They teach babies to be comfortable with books and can encourage a love of reading in later years. Board books also introduce early concepts such as shapes, colors and sounds. According to experts, reading to infants is beneficial for brain development, brain processing speed and vocabulary.

Here is a sampling of our collection:

Will Ladybug Hug?
by Hilary Leung
LadybugHug
This adorable book addresses giving consent. Ladybug likes to hug when greeting someone. She finds out that not everyone feels the same way and that is ok. Shows little ones forms of greeting others and teaches compromise.

ABC’s of the Web
by John C Vanden-Heuvel Sr & Andrey Ostrovsky, MD
ABCWEB
This ABC guide uses each letter of the alphabet to introduce and explain a computer word or phrase. The child friendly illustrations that accompany each letter will help make tots tech savvy. What does PHP stand for? Don’t know? Check out the letter P

Tinkle Tinkle Little Star
by Chris Tougas
TinkleLittleStar
Humorous potty training book that instructs little star where not to “go”. Little star’s animated reactions add to the story in a whimsical way. Written in the style of classic lullaby Twinkle Twinkle Little Star.

Dr Seuss’s 100 First Words
Seuss100firstwords
Dr. Seuss’ illustrations highlight this collection of baby’s first words. A delightful introduction to the world of Dr Seuss.

Don Quixote: A Spanish Language Primer Jennifer Adams (Baby Lit Series)
DonQuixotePrimer
Baby Lit uses classic books as inspiration and applies them to different subjects. Don Quixote teaches simple words in Spanish keeping with the theme of the story. Other titles/concepts available are Wizard of Oz, Little Women and Sherlock Holmes.

Yoga Bug
by Sarah Jane Hinder
YogaBug
A collection of kid friendly yoga poses. In addition to teaching poses, an insect similar to each pose is highlighted. Brief descriptions of all poses are also included.

Monster Munch
by Tobias Krejtschi
monster munch
A group of silly looking monsters have favorite foods that correspond with how they look. This interactive board book teaches toddlers different shapes.

The Many Faces of Snoopy
ManyfacesofSnoopy
From the Flying Ace to Flash Beagle, personas that Snoopy has taken on over the years are represented in this book. A cute compilation for Snoopy fans young and old.

This is just a fraction of all the awesome board books we have in our collection. Next time you and your little one are at the library, stop by the Children’s department and check them out. The Children’s Department at 500 Park Avenue has temporarily moved to the first floor; you can also stop by our Children’s Section at the Pop Up Branch at 124 Grand St.  See you soon!!!

Written by:
Megan Flynn
Children’s Library Assistant

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