Tag Archives: suicide

Preventing Suicide: Suggested Resources and Contact Numbers

17 May

The new Netflix series 13 Reasons Why, based on the novel Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher, has a lot of people discussing teen suicide.  Suicide is an important topic since each year in the United States over 34,000 people die by suicide and over 860,000 people attempt suicide, which averages to a person attempting suicide every 38 seconds.  Too often the topic is viewed as taboo and people incorrectly believe that discussing suicide with a depressed person may put the idea in their head.  When I was in high school a classmate committed suicide; she was a sweet, funny, and smart girl whose loss was felt by many.  For this blog I wanted to give along with some books our library patrons can check out on the topic, some helpful phone numbers.

Remember, whether you yourself are in crisis or you are the family member or friend of someone who is, there is help out there and you don’t have to go through this alone.

NJ Hope Line 1-855-654-6735
New Jersey’s 24/7 Peer Support & Suicide Prevention Hotline

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255)
Nacional de Prevencion del Suicidio 1-888-628-9454
Provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for yourself or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals.

Here are some books available from BCCLS Libraries on the Topic of Suicide.

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Understanding Suicide: A National Epidemic, by Connie Goldsmith

Goldsmith examines causes of suicide and its impact on those whose loved ones committed suicide.  Understanding Suicide also looks at coping techniques and warning signs.

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Image via Amazon

Teen Suicide, by Judith Galas

In Teen Suicide, Galas looks at the rising issue of teen suicide, possible causes, and possible preventions.

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Teen Suicide, by Lorena Huddle and Jay Schleifer

The Teen Mental Health Series is written for teens in simple language to give them an overview of common mental health issues.  Teen Suicide looks at some of causes of suicide attempts, how to help someone that may be suicidal and places to look for assistance.

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Eight Stories Up: An Adolescent Chooses Hope Over Suicide, by DeQuincy A. Lezine, with David Brent

Eight Stories Up chronicles Lezine’s own struggles as well as providing expertise from psychiatric expert David Brent about the causes and treatment of suicide in young people.  Eight Stories Up is part of the Adolescent Mental Health Initiative series of books written for teenagers.

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Beyond Bullying: Breaking the Cycle of Shame, Bullying, and Violence, by Jonathan Fast

Beyond Bullying looks at causes of bullying.  Fast specifically looks at the harassment of LGBT teens that can lead to suicide, domestic abuse, and school shootings.  The author also makes suggestions for stemming the tide of bullying.

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Healing Suicidal Veterans: Recognizing, Supporting and Answering Their Pleas for Help, by Victor Montgomery

With a large number or returning veterans having symptoms of post-traumatic Stress Disorder, there has been an increase of suicides among the veterans returning from the Middle East.  Montgomery, himself a veteran, discusses in Healing Suicidal Veterans true stories of veterans’ experiences with mental health issues.  He also discusses warning signs and strategies for assistance.

Veterans in Crisis can call these numbers for help specifically for them:
Veterans Counseling Hotline CALL 1-866-VETS-NJ4 (1-866-838-7654)
Provides 24/7 peer support from Veterans who can relate, and case management – they follow up with you.

Veterans Crisis Line 1-800-273-TALK (8255) Veterans Press 1 or send a text message to 838255
Connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders.

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How I Stayed Alive When My Brain Was Trying to Kill Me: One Person’s Guide to Suicide Prevention, by Susan Rose Blauner

Blauner herself is the survivor of multiple suicide attempts and in How I Stayed Alive When My Brain Was Trying to Kill Me, she discusses her own experiences as well as coping mechanisms for those experiencing suicidal thoughts including support groups, journaling and creating a crisis plan.

For more information about services that can help for our local readers visit State of New Jersey Department of Human Services Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services: http://www.state.nj.us/humanservices/dmhas/home/

-Written by Aimee Harris, Head of Reference

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