Tag Archives: 000 generalities

Dewey Decimal Challenge: Book 3 – The News Sorority: Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, Christiane Amanpour — and the (Ongoing, Imperfect, Complicated) Triumph of Women in TV News by Sheila Weller (The 000s)

20 Jan

This week we are venturing into 070.1 territory, where we can go to find books on television news broadcasting. Let me start by saying that I have little to no knowledge regarding the history of news broadcasting on TV, and I am barely familiar with the current climate. In a previous post I mentioned my unquenchable thirst for information on current events, but, like many people, I get most of my news content online. While television is still considered an important source for news, especially for older viewers, traditional television viewing in general has been gradually declining. Television news providers have begun to transition to providing content on digital platforms in order to remain relevant. Pew Research Center reported in June 2016 that local TV news viewership was dropping and that late night TV news viewership, with the fastest decline of all three time slots (morning, early evening, and late night), had dropped twenty-two percent since 2007. With regard to national news, the morning time slot has been hit the hardest in recent years. It is a trying time to be a TV news anchor especially in a professional field that I’ve just recently learned is already considerably stressful due to the competition between a wealth of talented candidates over a few sought-after positions.

The News Sorority: Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, Christiane Amanpour – and the (Ongoing, Imperfect, Complicated) Triumph of Women in TV News by Sheila Weller (070.1 WEL)

news-sorority

In her book The News Sorority: Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, Christiane Amanpour — and the (Ongoing, Imperfect, Complicated) Triumph of Women in TV News, Sheila Weller documents the rise of three of TV’s most accomplished female news icons – Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, and Christiane Amanpour. Weller explores the personal and professional challenges all three women faced on the path to success, particularly the challenge of being female in a male-dominated profession. While detailing the trajectory of each woman’s life and career in depth, Weller relies heavily on insights from the friends, coworkers, and acquaintances. Weller’s thesis seems to be that Sawyer, Couric, and Amanpour were driven to push harder against sexist roadblocks due to tragic circumstances at different stages of their personal lives – the sudden death of Sawyer’s father when she was just twenty-four, the death of Couric’s first husband, and Amanpour’s unceremonious departure from her home country of Iran as a teen during the Islamic Revolution. While I do believe that these life events did contribute to each women’s tireless drive and great inner strength, Weller does not make a particularly strong case to support the singling out of these events. They are simply part of the awe-inspiring narrative of these women who prevailed despite having the cards stacked against them. It may be important to note that none of the subjects of this biography were interviewed themselves.

This selection was substantial at 436 pages (with very tiny type!), and I enjoyed every page despite there being no real in-depth analysis of the gender disparity in broadcasting. Weller is an objective biographer. She doesn’t glorify her subjects though she most certainly finds their stories inspiring. I was surprised to learn about Sawyer’s reputation in the biz as manipulative and insincere whilst still being well-respected by her colleagues. Weller draws back the curtain and reveals the cutthroat reality of television broadcasting. It’s cliché to say, but, in this business, only the strong survive, and they do so by eating the weak. For this, I take issue with the title – this is everything but a social gathering. This isn’t a sorority of sisters who champion each other behind closed doors, this is a ratings war: a battle for better interviewees, better producers, and coveted time slots. Sawyer, Couric, and Amanpour are just like their male counterparts in that respect although these woman are perhaps more deserving of prestige.

-Written by Sharlene Edwards, Senior Children’s Librarian

Click here to read past posts about Sharlene’s Dewey Decimal Challenge!

Dewey Decimal Challenge: Book 2: The Second Book of General Ignorance: Everything You Think You Know Is (Still) Wrong by John Lloyd and John Mitchinson (The 000s)

12 Jan

The very first thing that you should do once you have selected a nonfiction book is check the copyright date. Certain nonfiction subjects can become dated relatively quickly, especially books on medicine and health as well as space and astronomy. You wouldn’t want to borrow a book on our planetary system with a copyright date before 2006 as Pluto would still be considered a full-fledged planet! The 000s are one such area where you should be on the lookout especially concerning books about computers (004s) and general encyclopedias (030s). And speaking of the 030s, that’s just where we are headed–specifically the 031.02s.

The Second Book of General Ignorance: Everything You Think You Know Is (Still) Wrong by John Lloyd and John Mitchinson (031.02 LLO)

second-book-gen-ignorance

The Second Book of General Ignorance, written by John Lloyd and John Mitchinson, is what is referred to as a trivia book and is a sequel to a bestseller based on the British television panel game QI. Lloyd and Mitchinson are also the TV series-creator and head-researcher, respectively. The first book in the series, The Book of General Ignorance, aims to address and correct misconceptions people often have regarding common knowledge–that is to say things that we assume to be known by most people. The Second Book of General Ignorance follows suit providing answers to a multitude of questions while giving a brief explanation of why people might be making the wrong assumptions about a particular topic considered to be well-known. For example, if you had asked me last week about oranges–how I would determine whether one is ripe enough to eat–I would have revealed my total ignorance of this commonly enjoyed fruit. In fact, the ripeness of an orange can never be determined by the color of an orange’s skin because most oranges are artificially colored via ethylene gas. I’ve already shared this bit of knowledge with three people this week because it bowled me over! I will never avoid a greenish orange again.

Not only will taking a dip in the 031.02s aid you in winning trivia night, this pool of condensed knowledge will surely spark your curiosity. After learning from Lloyd and Mitchinson that the often cited spelling rule “i before e except after c” was abandoned in the UK in 2009, I had to know more about the history of the disputed old mnemonic. Something to keep in mind when reading any trivia book is that most topics are oversimplified. This is fine unless you intend to spread the word that if caught in a riptide, you should simply tread water as opposed to the conventional wisdom of swimming parallel to the shore. Then more research might be wise. For the record, I did look this up, and it is legit–studies have shown that your odds are better if you tread water.

Lloyd and Mitchinson’s book covers a lot of ground in just under three hundred pages from topics of geography to history to science. Unfortunately, there isn’t necessarily an obvious order to the book–no chapters or headings of any kind. While some questions seem to be grouped according to topic (Cleopatra questions are located near questions about Julius Caesar), most do not (sports questions next to questions about a bat’s eyesight). This is a disadvantage if your intention is to study a certain subject, but shouldn’t be a deterrent if you’re just hungry for bits of information.

I have always loved trivia books. I read and reread David Feldman’s Imponderables: The Solution to the Mysteries of Everyday Life, which taught me that there is no difference between a day that is “partly sunny” as opposed to “partly cloudy” except the time of day and perhaps the weathercaster’s outlook on life. There are so many assumptions that we make on a daily basis and so many questions to which we simply don’t know the answer (even if we deal in oranges). Trivia books can make us feel both incredibly ignorant and, after reading, finally enlightened.

-Written by Sharlene Edwards, Senior Children’s Librarian

Click here to read past posts about Sharlene’s Dewey Decimal Challenge!

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